Discussion:
Nebra Disk and its cultue.
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Kelpie
2010-05-21 11:15:15 UTC
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I presume you know about the Nebra Disk:

Imagine it as a circle which is divided in four by a sideways X . .
You can also imagine that the arms of the X touch the circumference of
the circle at four points corresponding to the rising sun in
midsummer, the rising of the sun in midwinter, the setting sun in
midwinter and the setting sun in midsummer - in that order, clockwise
from the top (north).

The angles of these lines are specific to latitude and correspond to
the latitude of where the Nebra Disk was found. They are also, given
the latitude, specific to time as the earth wobbles on its axis over
about twenty thousand years or so – the earth inclines towards the
sun, back and forth, in a fairly certain progression.

I am not going to argue about that...

What I do argue is that the semi circle found at the base of the disk
is in fact an ellipse. If you take the top edge of the semi circle and
reverse it upwards, it will form an ellipse – an eccentric ellipse
just like the path of the earth round the sun. You will find that the
ellipse is tabulated in about 366 'days' .

Because the earth moves in an ellipse around the sun, the rate of
change of daylight is not arithmetic – it (the rate of change) moves
slowly at each end of the ellipse (winter and summer) – long summer
days which hardly change until August and then the rate of change
speeds up until November, then it slows down and then long winter
nights. It doesn't start speeding up again until February You will
recognize these four points as corresponding to the ancient four
festivals of northern Europe.

Using such information as the angles on the Nebra Disk, it is possible
to predict length of day and night for any date and with other
calculated angles, any latitude.

The division of the circle into exactly four (all right angles) moves
over time and reaches its northern-most extremity on the latitude of
Glastonbury. This last happened about eight thousand years ago.

We are used to thinking of a year being twelve months but it is
possible to think of the year as just six months: Long winter nights,
rapid change in spring and then long summer days (Northern Europe).
The other six months being the opposite. There is no need to describe
an ellipse with the full progression, the full circle; half of it will
do.

Your comments please, helpful comments please; polemics is for the
baboons.

I lived as a kid with Northern European people who used no clocks nor
radio and used a language which is now foreign. They were the
survivors of a thousands of years culture who had ignored the use of
writing. Their 'being' of understanding was 'kinetic' I know that is a
clumsy phrase but it is the best guess I have right now.

Comments please. I have been trying to understand this for a very long
time and my mental acuity is beginning to decline.
Kelpie
2010-05-21 18:45:02 UTC
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Post by Kelpie
Imagine it as a circle which is divided in four by a sideways X . .
You can also imagine that the arms of the X touch the circumference of
the circle at four points corresponding to the rising sun in
midsummer, the rising of the sun in midwinter, the setting sun in
midwinter and the setting sun in midsummer - in that order, clockwise
from the top (north).
The angles of these lines are specific to latitude and correspond to
the latitude of where the Nebra Disk was found. They are also, given
the latitude, specific to time as the earth wobbles on its axis over
about twenty thousand years or so – the earth inclines towards the
sun, back and forth, in a fairly certain progression.
I am not going to argue about that...
What I do argue is that the semi circle found at the base of the disk
is in fact an ellipse. If you take the top edge of the semi circle and
reverse it upwards, it will form an ellipse – an eccentric ellipse
just like the path of the earth round the sun. You will find that the
ellipse is tabulated in about 366  'days' .
Because the earth moves in an ellipse around the sun, the rate of
change of daylight is not arithmetic – it (the rate of change) moves
slowly at each end of the ellipse (winter and summer) – long summer
days which hardly change until August and then the rate of change
speeds up until November, then it slows down and then long winter
nights. It doesn't start speeding up again until February  You will
recognize these four points as corresponding to the ancient four
festivals of northern Europe.
Using such information as the angles on the Nebra Disk, it is possible
to predict length of day and night for any date and with other
calculated angles, any latitude.
The division of the circle into exactly four (all right angles) moves
over time and reaches its northern-most extremity on the latitude of
Glastonbury. This last happened about eight thousand years ago.
We are used to thinking of a year being twelve months but it is
possible to think of the year as just six months: Long winter nights,
rapid change in spring and then long summer days (Northern Europe).
The other six months being the opposite. There is no need to describe
an ellipse with the full progression, the full circle; half of it will
do.
Your comments please, helpful comments please; polemics is for the
baboons.
I lived as a kid with Northern European people who used no clocks nor
radio and used a language which is now foreign. They were the
survivors of a thousands of years culture who had ignored the use of
writing. Their 'being' of understanding was 'kinetic' I know that is a
clumsy phrase but it is the best guess I have right now.
Comments please. I have been trying to understand this for a very long
time and my mental acuity is beginning to decline.
I'm not an academic, I'm systems bred in a multinational. If this
isn't relevant here, could someone please cross post it to another
group. I will not br offended by a wild card.
Meh
2010-05-21 21:21:33 UTC
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On Fri, 21 May 2010 11:45:02 -0700 (PDT), Kelpie
Post by Kelpie
I'm not an academic,
Trust me, we KNEW that.
Kelpie
2010-05-22 12:53:41 UTC
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Post by Meh
On Fri, 21 May 2010 11:45:02 -0700 (PDT), Kelpie
Post by Kelpie
I'm not an academic,
Trust me, we KNEW that.
I wonder why the pique?
Kelpie
2010-05-23 10:10:34 UTC
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Post by Meh
On Fri, 21 May 2010 11:45:02 -0700 (PDT), Kelpie
Post by Kelpie
I'm not an academic,
Trust me, we KNEW that.
The ancient conceptual models of Northern Europe, closer to the Arctic
Circle are different to those of Southern Europe, closer to the Tropic
of Cancer. The two regions might as well be on different planets. The
attempt to identify the ellipse at the base of the Nebra as being the
'boat ' of middle eastern mythology may just be an example of 'herd'
thinking.
Kelpie
2010-05-26 10:56:00 UTC
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Post by Kelpie
Post by Meh
On Fri, 21 May 2010 11:45:02 -0700 (PDT), Kelpie
Post by Kelpie
I'm not an academic,
Trust me, we KNEW that.
The ancient conceptual models of Northern Europe, closer to the Arctic
Circle are different to those of Southern Europe, closer to the Tropic
of Cancer.  The two regions might as well be on different planets. The
attempt to identify the ellipse at the base of the Nebra as being the
'boat ' of middle eastern mythology may just be an example of 'herd'
thinking.
There's nobody here but us chickens.

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